September 19, 2020

CP Online Health

Eat Well, Life Well

I had intended to write about a piece of research today, but as I read all the news reports about how much life has changed and needs to change more, I’ve decided it’s time to address important issues facing health professionals working in pain management and rehabilitation.

In New Zealand the alert level is at 2 out of 4. I suspect this has been instituted to soften the shock later in the week when we’re asked to completely lock down. We are currently being asked to maintain physical distancing, older folks are asked to self isolate as much as possible, GPs and nurses are being asked to move to virtual consultations, and all of us who can are being asked to work from home.

What is not happening is guidance from the Occupational Therapy Board NZ, or the Physiotherapy Board NZ. Further: ACC has permitted psychology and medical consultations via video links, but not occupational therapy, physiotherapy or the group programme under the Community Pain Contracts.

I’ve watched my massage therapy colleagues in NZ close their businesses because it’s not possible to provide safe therapy in this environment. Video conferencing is, however, completely feasible for occupational therapy and physiotherapy – I’ve been offering services via video for some years now. But apparently we’re somehow not included in those privileged to provide video services? It seems out of step, and perhaps demonstrates how little those making policy actually understand about our work.

I intend to run my next group session (tomorrow) as my last, the 4th week of six. The remaining two sessions will be run by video link. I’ll be working from home except Wednesday morning when I’ll go into work to pick up some things. The University is still arguing that we can go into work – but I work in offices in the Hospital building. I have elderly parents. My partner is immune compromised. I don’t want to distribute bugs from my perambulations to my partner, my parents, or casual encounters in at the Hospital.

In preparation for working from home, I’m returning to strategies I used while working on my PhD. That means maintaining my daily routine – up and about and at the computer by 8.00am. Working steadily through the day, breaking the day up using Pomodoro technique (how many tomatoes can I smash?). I’ll finish the day at 4.30pm. I’ll make sure I have my 5 minute movement snacks, along with glasses of water (and coffee!).

My office is set up with the “Focus” setting so I don’t get interrupted by social media, email, or news notifications. I have good lighting, heating, and a comfy seat. This is my work space. Luckily I can keep it separate from where I relax! I have access to reference books and journals, and I can video conference from where I sit. As usual it’s a clutter, but that’s the way I like my environment!

I suppose what I’m saying is that life will go on, albeit differently. And that adjusting to it means allowing myself to work differently but maintaining some of the habits that keep me on-task and focused. Being disciplined allows me the freedom to work without distractions – oooh squirrel! And I can still stop and notice what is beautiful in my environment.

Kia kaha (stay strong), arohanui (much love), and remember this:

Naku te rourou nau te rourou ka ora ai te iwi

With your basket, and my basket, the people will live